Introduction

Our specialization is design and assessment for programming and operations in the Human Services and Education Sectors. The Spring Cleaning recommendations are, of course, reflective of this.

Our “2 Tips” this week are:

  1. Take the spring season as an opportunity to do this spring cleaning.
  2. Make Light spring cleaning actions, ensuring that this is practical and fun.

Below, check-out four simple but rewarding spring cleaning actions!

Light Spring Cleaning Actions

1.) The Big Picture

Revisit the Strategic Plan. Print a large version with check-off marks at items already accomplished. Then circle and date items that will be accomplished throughout the remainder of the year. Post the Strategic Plan with these markings in a staff frequented space.

Benefit: A visual reminder of the Strategic Plan will ensure that the entire team is reminded of the larger vision and specific focus of the remainder of the year.

Time Allotment: 1-hr

2.) The Processes

Take one to three paper-based forms and transition them to electronic versions. This action tweaks your current processes to incorporate a digit approach to submitting or managing information. The electronic versions might include a fillable pdf, a website-based form, or a google form. This will feel so good to get it done. Depending on the skillset of your staff team and current form technologies, this action might mean that a staff-specific expectation or a client-specific expectation now must be engaged online through your website. For example, instead of your staff submitting reimbursement requests on a paper form, develop an electronic form that staff members can use that might have an option for uploading relevant receipts.

Benefit: There never seems to be time to move all processes that include paper forms into electronic approaches. Do this piece-by-piece, making it a practical goal to achieve (start this spring).

Time Allotment: 2 to 3-hrs depending on the electronic form type

3.) The Social Media

Choose seven recent staff and client photos to share in your social media platforms. For example, if your org has a Twitter account, one time a month share a staff photo and a point about your staff team’s strengths. Likewise, once a month do the same for with a client photo and strengths. Establish in your calendar the dates each month when you’re going to take five minutes to do this. Make it easy with a folder that holds the full set of pictures for easy access.

Benefit: A social media editorial calendar doesn’t need to be complex. The goal of an editorial calendar is to connect to your community through the social media platforms that you have established for your org. Two monthly posts (e.g. a picture and short statement about your staff team and another about your clients’ successes) is doable with a little upfront planning.

Time Allotment: 1-hr for the initial planning and 5-minutes for each scheduled sharing day

The following fourth action is an interesting option that helps your organizational space reflect the value in streamlining. While you likely focus on streamlining your processes and data collection approaches, why not choose a spot in your offices to also streamline?

4.) The Space

Choose one spot in the office to declutter (e.g. a 10x10 space, not an entire room). Everyone must agree to contribute to keeping it decluttered. The space that you choose might be a huge bookshelf. In such examples, check-out tips from the famous Japanese declutter guru Marie Kondo. Two helpful videos to review include this one (A 45-min thorough lecture on the specialist’s approach; watch at least the first half) and this second video (A 5-minToday Show quick tips discussion).

Benefit: Space-by-space, your office can transition to visibly reflect your organizational values. Decluttering is aligned with many organizational values such as streamlining, clarity, and access.

Time Allotment: 1 to 2-hrs

P.S.

If you get inspired to “Deep Clean,” check out these two sources for getting down to it:

Spring Cleaning Time for Your Organization’s Fundraising Database By John Hoffman of Nonprofit Quarterly

Nonprofit Spring Cleaning Part One – Tackling Your Donor Data By Ann Green